PIERCING GUNS - Why They Are Not Suitable For Body Piercing

It is the position of the Association of Professional Piercers that only sterile disposable equipment is suitable for body piercing, and that only materials which are certified as safe for internal implant should be placed in inside a fresh or unhealed piercing.

While piercing guns may seem to be a quick, easy, and convenient way of creating holes, they have major drawbacks in terms of sterility, tissue damage and inappropriate jewelry design.

Reusable ear piercing guns can put clients in direct contact with the blood and body fluids of previous clients.

Plastic ear piercing guns cannot be autoclave sterilized and may not be sufficiently cleaned between use on multiple clients. Even if the antiseptic wipes used were able to kill all pathogens on contact, simply wiping the external surfaces of the gun with isopropyl alcohol or other antiseptics does not kill pathogens within the working parts of the gun.

Piercing guns can cause significant tissue damage.

Most ear piercing studs are quite dull. Piercings with a gun must be accomplished by using excessive pressure over a larger surface area in order to force the metal shaft through the skin. The effect on the body is more like a crush injury than a piercing and causes similar tissue damage. Also known as “blunt force trauma.” causing significant pain and swelling for the client, scarring, a severe tissue disfigurement.

The length and design of gun studs is inappropriate for healing piercings.

Ear piercing studs are too short for some earlobes and most cartilage. The pressure of the gun’s mechanism is sufficient to force the pieces to lock over the tissue, once they are locked on, the compressed tissue cannot return to its normal state, is constricted and further irritated. The diminished air and blood circulation in the compressed tissue can lead to prolonged healing, minor complications and scarring.

The use of piercing guns is absolutely inappropriate and very dangerous.